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This Day In History – November 11

 

History is a symphony of echoes heard and unheard. It is a poem with events as verses. ~Charles Angoff

 

Plow & Hearth

 
 

Laureate bust of Diocletian


Ancient History 308 – Roman Emperor emeritus Diocletian attempts order in the Empire

At Carnuntum, Emperor emeritus Diocletian confers with Galerius, Augustus of the East, and Maximianus, the recently returned former Augustus of the West, in an attempt to restore order to the Roman Empire.

 
 
 
 


History of Rome 1/9

 
 

Last Supper meal (upper image) and preparatory washing of feet (lower image) in a 1220 manuscript in the Badische Landesbibliothek


Medieval Church History 1215 – Early Church council meets to determine doctorine

The Fourth Lateran Council meets, defining the doctrine of transubstantiation, the process by which bread and wine are, by that doctorine, said to transform into the body and blood of Christ.

The Fourth Council of the Lateran was convoked by Pope Innocent III with the papal bull of April 19, 1213, and the Council gathered at Rome’s Lateran Palace beginning November 11, 1215. Due to the great length of time between the Council’s convocation and meeting, many bishops had the opportunity to attend. It was the 12th ecumenical council and is sometimes called the “Great Council” or “General Council of Lateran” due to the presence of seventy-one patriarchs and metropolitan bishops, four hundred and twelve bishops, and nine hundred abbots and priors together with representatives of several monarchs.

Wikipedia

The Lateran Palace with the Obelisk of Thutmosis III and (right) the annexed Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, from an 18th century engraving by Giuseppe Vasi.

 
 
 


Science 1675 – Calculus first demonstrated

Gottfried Leibniz demonstrates integral calculus for the first time to find the area under the graph of y = ƒ(x).

Leibniz occupies a prominent place in the history of mathematics and the history of philosophy. He developed the infinitesimal calculus independently of Isaac Newton, and Leibniz’s mathematical notation has been widely used ever since it was published. He became one of the most prolific inventors in the field of mechanical calculators. While working on adding automatic multiplication and division to Pascal’s calculator, he was the first to describe a pinwheel calculator in 1685 and invented the Leibniz wheel, used in the arithmometer, the first mass-produced mechanical calculator. He also refined the binary number system, which is at the foundation of virtually all digital computers.

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Gottfried Wilhem Leibniz

 

Leibniz quest for Pi

 
 

Incident in Cherry Valley


American Revolution 1778 – Cherry Valley Massacre

On this day in 1778, Patriot Colonel Ichabod Alden refuses to believe intelligence about an approaching hostile force. As a result, a combined force of Loyalists and Native Americans, attacking in the snow, killed more than 40 Patriots, including Alden, and took at least an additional 70 prisoners, in what is known today as the Cherry Valley Massacre. The attack took place east of Cooperstown, New York, in what is now Otsego County.

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Second Albany re-enactment at Cherry Valley N.Y.


 
 


Civil War 1864 – Sherman’s March to the Sea begins

Union General William Tecumseh Sherman begins burning Atlanta, Georgia to the ground in preparation for his march south.

Sherman’s March to the Sea is the name commonly given to the Savannah Campaign conducted around Georgia from November 15, 1864 to December 21, 1864 by Maj. Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman of the Union Army in the American Civil War. The campaign began with Sherman’s troops leaving the captured city of Atlanta, Georgia, on November 16 and ended with the capture of the port of Savannah on December 21. It inflicted significant damage, particularly to industry and infrastructure (per the doctrine of total war), and also to civilian property. Military historian David J. Eicher wrote that Sherman “defied military principles by operating deep within enemy territory and without lines of supply or communication. He destroyed much of the South’s physical and psychological capacity to wage war.”

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I have already received guns that can cast heavy and destructive shot as far as the heart of your city; also, I have for some days held and controlled every avenue by which the people and garrison of Savannah can be supplied, and I am therefore justified in demanding the surrender of the city of Savannah, and its dependent forts, and shall wait a reasonable time for your answer, before opening with heavy ordnance. Should you entertain the proposition, I am prepared to grant liberal terms to the inhabitants and garrison; but should I be forced to resort to assault, or the slower and surer process of starvation, I shall then feel justified in resorting to the harshest measures, and shall make little effort to restrain my army—burning to avenge the national wrong which they attach to Savannah and other large cities which have been so prominent in dragging our country into civil war.

— William T. Sherman , Message to William J. Hardee, December 17, 1864, recorded in his memoirs


Sherman’s March – Part I – The History Channel


Sherman’s March to the Sea

A collection of photos and paintings depicting Sherman’s March to the Sea,

 

We are not only fighting armies, but a hostile people, and must make old and young, rich and poor, feel the hard hand of war, as well as their organized armies. I know that this recent movement of mine through Georgia has had a wonderful effect in this respect. Thousands who had been deceived by their lying papers into the belief that we were being whipped all the time, realized the truth, and have no appetite for a repetition of the same experience.

Letter, Sherman to Henry W. Halleck, December 24, 1864.

 
 

Rowdy Joe Lowe


Old West 1873 – Gunman Edward Beard dies in Delano Kansas from gunfight wounds

Gunman Edward T. Beard, AKA Red Beard, died two weeks after being shot by gunman “Rowdy” Joe Lowe. Beard was at odds with the dreaded gunman Rowdy Joe Lowe, who had built a saloon next to Beard’s (winning in a race to see who could build a dance hall first). On October 27, Beard, drinking heavily, accused one of his prostitutes, Jo DeMerritt, of stealing from him. DeMerritt threw a bottle at him and fled next door to Lowe’s saloon. The drunken Beard followed her, staggered into Lowe’s, and in the smoke-filled place mistook another prostitute, Annie Franklin, for DeMerritt. He fired a shot which struck the woman in the stomach. Lowe then grabbed a shotgun and exchanged shots with Beard. Lowe’s shot missed but Beard’s bullet grazed Lowe’s neck. A stray bullet struck and wounded bystander Bill Anderson who was standing at the bar.

Beard fled and Lowe, as drunk as his quarry, went after him. Both men, mounted on horses and racing out of town, had a running gunfight. Lowe caught up with Beard near the river bridge and emptied his shotgun into him, then rode back to town where he turned himself in to the sheriff. Beard was found critically wounded in the arm and thigh, loaded with buckshot. He clung to life for two weeks, but through loss of blood died on this date.

Source >> Today In Old West History

Dodge City Peace Commission

Wyatt Earp and the Dodge City Police Commission

 
 

Juan Cailles


Philippine–American War 1900 – Battle at Mabitac

Filipinos under Juan Cailles defeat Americans under Colonel Benjamin F. Cheatham at Mabitac.

The Philippine–American War, also known as the Philippine War of Independence or the Philippine Insurrection (1899–1902), was an armed conflict between a group of Filipino revolutionaries and the United States which arose from the struggle of the First Philippine Republic to gain independence following annexation by the United States. The war was part of a series of conflicts in the Philippine struggle for independence, preceded by the Philippine Revolution and the Spanish–American War.

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The Battle of Manila, February 1899.

 
 

Men of U.S. 64th Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, celebrate the news of the Armistice, November 11, 1918


World War I 1819 – The War Ends

At 11 o’clock in the morning of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, the First World War–known at the time as the Great War–comes to an end.

By the end of autumn 1918, the alliance of the Central Powers was unraveling in its war effort against the better supplied and coordinated Allied powers. Facing exhausted resources on the battlefield, turmoil on the home front and the surrender of its weaker allies, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria and the Ottoman Empire, Germany was finally forced to seek an armistice with the Allies in the early days of November 1918. On November 7, the German chancellor, Prince Max von Baden, sent delegates to Compiegne, France, to negotiate the agreement; it was signed at 5:10 a.m. on the morning of November 11.

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How World War One Ended

 
 

Drill involving a Panzer III amphibious tank meant for Sea Lion


World War II 1940 – German Operation Sea Lion (invasion of Britain) postponed indefinitely

Following the German defeat in the Battle of Britain, Hitler postpones Operation Sea Lion indefinitely.

Operation Sea Lion (German: Unternehmen Seelöwe) was Germany’s plan to invade the United Kingdom during the Second World War, beginning in 1940. To have had any chance of success, however, the operation would have required air and naval supremacy over the English Channel. With the German defeat in the Battle of Britain, Sea Lion was postponed indefinitely.

By early November 1939, Adolf Hitler had decided on forcing a decision in the West by invading Belgium, the Netherlands and France. With the prospect of the Channel ports falling under Kriegsmarine (German Navy) control and attempting to anticipate the obvious next step that might entail, Grand Admiral (Großadmiral) Erich Raeder (head of the Kriegsmarine) instructed his Operations officer, Kapitän Hans Jürgen Reinicke, to draw up a document examining “the possibility of troop landings in England should the future progress of the war make the problem arise.”

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The Battle of Britain


Battle of Britain Newsreels

 
 
 

Let the American youth never forget, that they possess a noble inheritance, bought by the toils, and sufferings, and blood of their ancestors; and capacity, if wisely improved, and faithfully guarded, of transmitting to their latest posterity all the substantial blessings of life, the peaceful enjoyment of liberty, property, religion, and independence.” –Joseph Story, Commentaries on the Constitution, 1833

America remember and honor your history – it will give direction,
purpose and security to your future.

 

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