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Jonathan Swift: The Steady Tyranny Of Law Over Rights

The people of Lilliput binding Lemuel Gulliver.  Print from Gulliver's Travels 1726, Jonathan Swift

The people of Lilliput binding Lemuel Gulliver. Print from Gulliver’s Travels 1726, Jonathan Swift


It is a maxim among lawyers that whatever hath been done before may be done again, and therefore they take special care to record all the decisions formerly made against common justice and the general reason of mankind. These, under the name of precedents, they produce as authorities to justify the most iniquitous opinions, and the judges never fail of directing them accordingly.”

— Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) Irish author, Source: Gulliver’s Travels, 1726

 

Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift (30 November 1667 – 19 October 1745) was an Anglo-Irish satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for the Whigs, then for the Tories), poet and cleric who became Dean of St Patrick’s Cathedral, Dublin.

He is remembered for works such as Gulliver’s Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, Drapier’s Letters, The Battle of the Books, An Argument Against Abolishing Christianity, and A Tale of a Tub. Swift is regarded by the Encyclopædia Britannica as the foremost prose satirist in the English language, and is less well known for his poetry.

 
 
 

Binding the American People and the U.S. Constitution with one Executive Order after another.

Binding the American People and the U.S. Constitution with one Executive Order after another.

 

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