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This Day In U.S. History November 16, 1776 – Patriot Ft. Washington Falls & An American Heroine Is Born Of The Conflict

 

Margaret Corbin at the Battle of Fort Washington, November 16, 1776

Margaret Corbin at the Battle of Fort Washington, November 16, 1776

 

This Day In U.S. History November 16, 1776 – Struggle for Life, Liberty and Pursuit of Happiness – The American Revolution: An overwhelming force led by Hessian Lieutenant General Wilhelm von Knyphausen and a force of 3,000 Hessian mercenaries and 5,000 Redcoats lay siege to Fort Washington at the northern end and highest point of Manhattan Island. One Patriot defender was Mararet Corbin who fought alongside her husband, an event that would become legendary.

Source “The American Revolution Day By Day – Lighting Freedom’s Flame”

 

British warships trying to pass between Forts Washington and Lee

British warships trying to pass between Forts Washington and Lee

 

The Battle of Fort Washington was fought in New York on November 16, 1776 during the American Revolutionary War between the United States and Great Britain. It was a decisive British victory that gained the surrender of the entire garrison of Fort Washington near the north end of Manhattan Island.

After defeating the Continental Army under Commander-in-Chief General George Washington at the Battle of White Plains, the British Army forces under the command of Lieutenant General William Howe planned to capture Fort Washington, the last American stronghold on Manhattan. General Washington issued a discretionary order to General Nathanael Greene to abandon the fort and remove its garrison of 3,000 men to New Jersey. Colonel Robert Magaw, commanding the fort, declined to abandon it as he believed it could be defended from the British. Howe’s forces attacked the fort before Washington reached it to assess the situation.

Howe launched his attack on November 16. He led an assault from three sides: the north, east and south. Tides in the Harlem River prevented some troops from landing and delayed attack. When the British moved against the defenses, the southern and western American defenses fell quickly. Patriot forces on the north side offered stiff resistance to the Hessian attack, but they too were eventually overwhelmed. With the fort surrounded by land and sea, Colonel Magaw chose to surrender. A total of 59 Americans were killed and 2,837 were taken as prisoners of war.
After this defeat, most of Washington’s army was chased across New Jersey and into Pennsylvania, and the British consolidated their control of New York and eastern New Jersey. Source Wikipedia.

 

Battle map

Battle map

 

Throughout the morning, Knyphausen met stiff resistance from the Patriot riflemen inside the fort, but by afternoon, the Patriots were overwhelmed, and the garrison commander, Colonel Robert Magaw, surrendered. Nearly 3,000 Patriots were taken prisoner, and valuable ammunition and supplies were lost to the Hessians. The prisoners faced a particularly grim fate: Many later died from deprivation and disease aboard British prison ships anchored in New York Harbor.

Among the 53 dead and 96 wounded Patriots were John and Margaret Corbin of Virginia. When John died in action, his wife Margaret took over his cannon, cleaning, loading and firing the gun until she too was severely wounded. The first woman known to have fought for the Continental Army, Margaret survived, but lost the use of her left arm.

British troops crossing the Harlem River

British troops crossing the Harlem River

 

Two weeks earlier, one of Magaw’s officers, William Demont, had deserted the Fifth Pennsylvania Battalion and given British intelligence agents information about the Patriot defense of New York, including details about the location and defense of Fort Washington. Demont was the first traitor to the Patriot cause, and his treason contributed significantly to Knyphausen’s victory.

Fort Washington stood at the current location of Bennet Park in the Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City, near the George Washington Bridge, at the corner of Fort Washington Avenue and 183rd Street. Fort Washington Park and Fort Washington Point lay beneath the site along the Hudson River. Source Margaret Cochran Corbin (1751-1800)

 

Tablet commemorating the location of Fort Washington

Tablet commemorating the location of Fort Washington

 

Further reading about the Battle of Fort Washington
Heavy rains spoiled Maj. Gen, William Howe’s planned second attack on the American army near White Plains on October 31. The next day the Americans were found to be apparently well entrenched at North Castle Heights. The rebel earthworks were composed largely of cornstalks pulled from nearby fields, whose roots, full of clinging soil, faced outward. Howe may have been discouraged by these illusory defenses, but his goal remained the complete removal of American troops from Manhattan, not the annihilation of Washington’s army. His attention returned to Fort Washington which the American commander in chief had left garrisoned under Col. Robert Magaw after a general rebel evacuation of the island. Synopsis:

On the night of November 2 a defector, William Demont, entered the camp of Lord Hugh Percy at McGowan’s Pass, south of Fort Washington. Demont had been Magaw’s adjunct; the deserter placed the plans of the fort into Percy’s hands. Although Howe had probably already begun to arrange operations against Fort Washington, exact knowledge of the fortification and its defenses would assist his attack. More…

 

American Patriots and Margaret Corbin overrun by British and Hessian troops at the Battle of Fort Washington

American Patriots and Margaret Corbin overrun by British and Hessian troops at the Battle of Fort Washington

 

Timeline of the American Revolution – From the French-Indian War 1754-1763 to the Signing of The U.S. Constitution 1788.

 

America remember and honor your history – it will give direction, purpose and security to your future.


 
 
 
 
 

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