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This Day In U.S. History November 25, 1783 – The British military evacuates New York City

 

"Evacuation Day and Washington's Triumphal Entry"

“Evacuation Day and Washington’s Triumphal Entry”

 

This Day In U.S. History November 25, 1783 – Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness – The American Revolution: The last British troops leave New York City three months after the signing of the Treaty of Paris. – After occupying New York City for seven years during the American Revolution, the British military evacuates and General Washington and the Continental Army triumphantly enter the city. The last shot of the war was reported to be fired on this day, as a British gunner fired a cannon at jeering crowds gathered on the shore of Staten Island, as his ship passed through The Narrows at the mouth of New York Harbor. The little remembered horror of the British prison ships comes to an end.

 

Source “The American Revolution Day By Day – Lighting Freedom’s Flame”

 

 

Following the American Revolutionary War, Evacuation Day on November 25 marks the day in 1783 when the last vestige of British authority in the United States — its troops in New York — departed from Manhattan. After this British evacuation, General George Washington triumphantly led the Continental Army through the city. The last shot of the war was reported to be fired on this day, as a British gunner on one of the departing ships fired a cannon at jeering crowds gathered on the shore of Staten Island, at the mouth of New York Harbor (the shot fell well short of the shore).

 

"Washington's Entry into New York" by Currier & Ives

“Washington’s Entry into New York” by Currier & Ives

Following the first and largest major engagement of the Continental Army and British troops in the American Revolutionary War, at the Battle of Long Island (also known as the Battle of Brooklyn) on August 27, 1776, General George Washington and the Continental Army retreated to Manhattan Island. The Continentals withdrew north and west and, following the Battle of Fort Washington on November 16, 1776, evacuated the island. For the remainder of the Revolutionary War much of what is now Greater New York and its surroundings were under British control. New York City (then occupying only the southern tip of Manhattan) became, under Lord Howe and his brother Sir William, the British political and military center of operations in North America. David Mathews was the Mayor of New York City during the British occupation. More …

 

American patriots on British prison ship

American patriots on British prison ship

 

The Horror of the British Prison Ships of New York City Comes to an End
During the Revolutionary War, the British maintained a series of prison ships in the New York Harbor and jails on the shore for captured prisoners of war. Due to brutal conditions, more Americans died in British jails and prison ships in New York Harbor than in all the battles of the American Revolutionary War.The British quickly disposed of the bodies of the dead from the jails and ships by quick interment or throwing the bodies overboard. Following the end of the American Revolutionary War in 1783, the remains of those who died on the 16 prison ships were neglected, left to lie along the Brooklyn shore on Wallabout Bay, a rural area little visited by New Yorkers. On January 21, 1877, the New York Times reported that the dead came from all parts of the nation and “every state of the Union was represented among them.” More …

 

Further reading: British Prison Ships

 

"Prison Ship Martyrs' Monument", Wallabout Bay, East River, (now Fort Greene Park), New York-Brooklyn,

“Prison Ship Martyrs’ Monument”, Wallabout Bay, East River, (now Fort Greene Park), New York-Brooklyn,

Timeline of the American Revolution – From the French-Indian War 1754-1763 to the Signing of The U.S. Constitution 1788.

 

America remember and honor your history – it will give direction, purpose and security to your future.


 
 
 
 
 

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