Tag Archive: Liberty

This Day In History – September 18

    96 AD Ancient Rome – Nerva is proclaimed Roman Emperor after Domitian is assassinated 1502 Early Americas – Christopher Columbus lands at Costa Rica on his fourth, and final, voyage 1776 War of Independence – Washington reports to Congress on Battle of Harlem Heights 1830 Science History – American steam locomotive races horse …

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This Day In History – September 11

  History must be written of, by and for the survivors. Anonymous   Ancient Rome – The Ludi Romani – ‘Roman Games’ In Full Swing – 51 A.D. Ancient History – Louis I, the Pious Succeeds His Father French King Charlemagne – 814 Independence War – The Battle of Brandywine – Patriots Defeated But Unbroken …

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This Day In History – September 10

  September 10, 1608 – Early American History English adventurer John Smith to lead Jamestown English adventurer John Smith is elected council president of Jamestown, Virginia–the first permanent English settlement in North America. Smith, a colorful figure, had won popularity in the colony because of his organizational abilities and effectiveness in dealing with local Native …

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This Day In History – September 4

  September 4, 476 – Ancient History Western Roman Empire falls to Barbarians Romulus Augustus, the last emperor of the Western Roman Empire, is deposed by Odoacer, a German barbarian who proclaims himself king of Italy. Odoacer was a mercenary leader in the Roman imperial army when he launched his mutiny against the young emperor. …

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“Introduction to the Constitution”

  If you have an interest in learning more about the United States Constitution, its history, nature and relevance to America today, see the following announcement regarding a webcast series starting September 15, featuring Congressman Paul Ryan, columnist Charles Krauthammer, and members of the Hillsdale College faculty, sponserd by Hillsdale College, Spring Arbor, Michigan.   …

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This Day In History – September 3

  September 3, 1777 – American Revolution The Stars and Stripes flies for the first time in battle The American flag was flown in battle for the first time on this day in 1777, during a Revolutionary War skirmish at Cooch’s Bridge, Delaware. Patriot General William Maxwell ordered the “Stars and Stripes” banner raised as …

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This Day In History – August 25

    History never looks like history when you are living through it. ~John W. Gardner     August 25, 325 – Ancient Christian History Council of Nicaea concludes The Council of Nicaea, the first ecumenical debate held by the early Christian church, concludes with the establishment of the doctrine of the Holy Trinity. Convened …

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This Day In History – August 24

Follow ‘This Day In History’ During Weekdays At FACEBOOK Legacy-America August 24, 1776 – American Revolution General Lee recognizes Georgia’s value On this day in 1776, American General Charles Lee informs Congress that Georgia was more valuable than he had originally suspected. Lee argued that the state’s salubrious climate, crops of rice, numerous harbors and …

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This Day In History – August 20

The cemetery and memorial in Vassieux-en-Vercors where, in July 1944, German Wehrmacht forces executed more than 200, included women and children, in reprisal for the Maquis's armed resistance.

    Follow ‘This Day In History’ During Weekdays At FACEBOOK Legacy-America August 20, 1794 – American Westward Expansion – Indian Wars Battle of Fallen Timbers The Battle of Fallen Timbers was an important victory for the United States Army against natives in the Northwest Territory. In 1792, President George Washington appointed Anthony Wayne as …

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This Day In History – August 14

Japanese foreign affairs minister Mamoru Shigemitsu signs the Japanese Instrument of Surrender on board USS Missouri as General Richard K. Sutherland watches, September 2, 1945

August 14, 1776 – American Revolution Stamp Act remembered The city of Boston observes the 11th anniversary of the popular resistance that prevented the execution of the Stamp Act there on this day in 1776. The celebration included the erection of a pole at the site of the original “Liberty Tree.” The Stamp Act, passed …

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This Day In History – August 6

Hiroshima Peace Memorial

August 6, 1777 – American Revolution General Nicholas Herkimer falls at the Battle of Oriskany On this day in 1777, 800 of Patriot General Nicholas Herkimer’s militiamen from Tryon, County, New York, are ambushed as they attempt to relieve Fort Stanwix (now Rome, New York), which was occupied by the British. Herkimer was mortally wounded …

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History & Spirit In Song – “My Country Tis Of Thee, Sweet Land Of Liberty” – 1831

My Country 'Tis of Thee. ca 1861. Music Division, Library of Congress

MY COUNTRY TIS OF THEE –Samuel Francis Smith, 1831   Although we know that Reverend Samuel Francis Smith wrote the words to “My Country ‘Tis of Thee” (also known as “America”), the origin of the song’s melody remains a mystery. And the history of its verses is even more complex. Read more at the Library …

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This Day In History – July 31

Abba Kovner with members of the Fareynikte Partizaner Organizatsye

July 31, 1777 – American Revolution Marquis de Lafayette becomes a major-general without pay A 19-year-old French aristocrat, Marie-Joseph Paul Roch Yves Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette, accepts a commission as a major-general in the Continental Army—without pay. Young marquis escapes from prison to sail to the Americas to join the grand adventure to …

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The American Story & Its Ancient Roots Needs To Be Told With Fresh Emphasis

United States Declaration of Independence - Created June–July 1776 Ratified July 4, 1776

      The stories of America’s past and the people and events that have made it great have been ebbing from the public mind for decades. These historical moments are no longer focused on by the news and entertainment industries, academia, even government agencies are silent about America’s defining moments and the historical foundations …

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This Day In U.S. History – July 16

The only surviving color photograph of the Trinity explosion. Photo by Jack Aeby.

July 16, 1779 – American Revolution – American Brigadier Anthony Wayne Earns Bold Nickname American Brigadier General Anthony Wayne launches a coup de main against British fortifications at Stony Point, New York, on the orders of General George Washington. He earns the moniker “Mad” Anthony Wayne for the ensuing maneuver. This Day In History Anthony …

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Declaration of Independence – An Expression Of The American Mind

220px-Declaration_independence

A good article at The American Spectator about the sentiments in the colonies 235 years ago regarding independence and two relatively unknown but great American statesmen and their role in helping America take that momentous step and move into the future. The two men were Roger Sherman of Connecticut and Robert R. Livingston of New …

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Inspiration For The U.S. Constitution – Magna Carta

In 1957 the American Bar Association acknowledged the debt American law and constitutionalism had to Magna Carta by erecting a monument at Runnymede.

    Over half a millennia, five hundred and seventy-two years before the U.S. Constitution was written in 1787, a document was wrought in England challenging the monarchy, establishing certain rights, liberties and protections for the barons and people of the nation and freedom for the Church. Born(e) of grievances and rebellion from a “combination …

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A Life of Service – “This One Is Captain Waskow” –Ernie Pyle, 1944

Captain Henry T. Waskow

Unknown American Hero On this Memorial Day weekend a sobering but inspiring reminder of the price paid by hundreds of thousands of American military personnel during WWII, an account of the death of U.S. Capt. Henry T. Waskow written by the famous war journalist Ernie Pyle on December 14, 1943, during the Battle of San …

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Armed Citizen – The Right And Benefit

Mexican-Bandit

True stories of the Right and Benefit to Keep and Bear Arms for self-defense. Stand And Deliver. Americans are rarely held up on roads and byways by bandits and highwaymen as in yesteryear. But thousands of peaceful citizens are still today assailed in their homes by robbers and the desperate. There are countless, generally untold …

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Faith And Freedom

Israel's Escape from Egypt

What does Western Civilization, slavery-freedom, Easter, Passover, deliverance from plagues and sin by a Paschal Lamb and the swirl of events in ancient Egypt have in common now thousands of years into human history?

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